A secretive life

As promised before, here’s the first by-weekly blog post about running a start-up dev studio.

During these weeks, I’ve been booking meetings for Nordic Game Conference, prepared a company pitch for Connect (a company serving as a meeting place between entrepreneurs and venture capitalists), visited the Start-Up Day 2012 in Stockholm and made a major change of course on our first project. Trouble is, I can’t go into the details. Not because it’s boring to read (I’ll make it fun to read!), but also because I perhaps should guard the details for now.

Which is a shame. Running a new business requires lots of time (and I’m far from the one spending most hours at work), yet there’s not much to talk about regarding it. Very much because of this, “a secretive life” has become a recurring phrase in my mind the two last weeks, knowing I had to write something here. I’d have liked bringing pictures, too, but I sadly didn’t. Maybe next event…

Well, that’s for the day-to-day work (I’m at a computer, like so many other people). I could write about the start-up day for a bit, though, because that was a fun event.

Very much because of this, “a secretive life” has become a recurring phrase in my mind the two last weeks, knowing I had to write something here. I’d have liked bringing pictures, too, but I sadly didn’t. Maybe next time.

Also, I realize this is a week late, so I’ll type down a few on-my-mind words about Batman: Akham City, or actually about parallell story lines. I started playing it the other day, and so far it’s great. However, the game features short chapters of Catwoman between the Batman chapter. Even though Catwoman has some really fun gameplay, I don’t like the decision to have their storylines alter between them. So far, they’ve always ended in cliff-hangers, which means I’m very exited about a character’s plot when it ends, only to be thrown back to a character whose story I, at that point, don’t care at all about. Just to have the same thing happened once I’ve build that care. I see this so often in all manner of media it feels like some kind of “writer’s best practice” (in which case, I beg to differ). If someone could explain to me why you’d do this to a story, I would be grateful.

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